© 2019 SoloFLAMENCO 

LA FEMME

LA FEMME! offers the opportunity to experience highly skilled professions with a dynamic performance from old time classics to more contemporary sounds, presented in a way novice to connoisseurs can enjoy or find a new passion.

This is a collaborative work between concert guitarist and Stellenbosch Konservatorium lecturer Nina Fourie-Gouws and SoloFLAMENCO's lead dancer Tanya Diamond.

LA FEMME!'s debut performance was at the US WoordFees Arts Festival 2019 and is scheduled for most major festivals around South Africa.

A follow-up show can be expected for 2020.

PROGRAMME

  1. Koyunbaba - C. Domeniconi (b. 1947)

  2. Capricho Árabe - F. Tárrega (1852-1909)

  3. Entr'acte - J. Ibert (1890-1962)

  4. Paisaje Cubano con Campanas - L. Brouwer (1939)

  5. Una Limosna por el Amor de Dios - A. Barrios (1885-1944)

  6. Allegro from Concerto for Strings, RV 119 - A. Vivaldi (1678-1741)

  7. Asturias - I. Albéniz (1860–1909)

  8. Siguirilla - traditional flamenco

  9. Danza Caracteristica - L. Brouwer (1939)

“Flamenco was born as an expression of the people: the peasants and outcasts as an outcry of their soul. To be authentic Flamenco is to be truthful to yourself, who you are and what you feel. It is about finding the primitive beat that pulsates in your blood and fuels emotion to deliver it through the dance.

This is possibly one of the principal reasons why it speaks to so many diverse audiences worldwide as it delves into the emotional side that all humans experience. In this context, the magnificent clothing associated with the art of flamenco can nearly be seen as a mere reflection of the era of commercialisation of the art, but being dressed up in full flair of Flamenco frills doesn’t necessarily make one authentic Flamenco.

To be authentic Flamenco is more a choice the artist makes of how they choose to honestly express themselves. La Femme!is the reflection of the female soul in all its dimensions: the feminine and the masculine, simplicity versus complexity, sorrow and hurt that turns into joy. Today I see and feel Flamenco in everything: the Siguirilla from the strings of the guitar, to Vivaldi ... to the beat emanating from my turn indicator in my car.”

-Tanya Diamond

In 1985 the Italian guitarist, Carlo Domeniconi (b.1947) wrote Koyunbaba, a virtuosic composition in four movements. Domeniconi had taught at the Istanbul Conservatoire between1977 and 1980, in the process absorbing many influences from Turkish music. ‘Koyunbaba’ means ‘shepherd’ but also refers to a 13th century holy man after whom an area in south west Turkey isnamed. The two ideas are brought together in Domeniconi’s concept, that a shepherd is uniquely

given both the time and insight to contemplate and understand the vastness and immense power of nature. Each of the four movements develops a separate mood in the hypnotic fashion of eastern music and on a time-scale that reflects the unhurried life of both shepherd and mystic, using a widerange of the guitar’s available devices and textures.

Francisco Tárrega, the founder of a new school of guitar, composed an immense number of guitar music for his time, totalling 78 original scores and 120 transcriptions. Tárrega’s extremely popular Capricho Árabe, composed after a trip to Granada, can be seen as his representation of the Arabian influence on Spanish music, dating back to the Moorish occupation of the Iberian Peninsula during the 8th Century AD. This is best heard in the piece's use of the Phrygian mode, as heard in the opening phrase.

The French composer Jacques Ibert studied under Paul Vidal at the Paris Conservatoire and won the Prix de Rome in 1919 for his cantata Le poète et la fée. From 1937 he was director of the French Academy in Rome, and from 1955 to 1957 directed Paris' Opéra-Comique. This brief but brilliant Entr'acte is one of his most well-recognized works and a direct product of his love for Spanish literature and music. It opens with a breathless, whirling dance with propulsive accompaniment, inspired by Flamenco guitar music. Palmas is a style of handclapping used in Flamenco music as an essential form of percussion to help punctuate and accentuate the piece.

The Afro-Cuban composer, classical guitarist and conductor, Leo Brouwer, was born in 1939 (Cuba). His enormous influence on classical guitar music is demonstrated by more than a hundred recordings on which he has played, composed or conducted. Paisaje Cubano con Campanas (Cuban Landscape with Bells) written in 1986, is a fascinating piece which the multiple personalities of theguitar are brought to expression through Brouwer’s unique 20th century language. The piece usesrepeated fragments, harmonics and some special effects to create a sound landscape from whichthe listeners are transported to Fidel Castro’s Cuba.

Virtuoso, guitar composer, and poet Agustín Barrios Mangoré (1885-1944) was born in Southern Paraguay.. He was perhaps the greatest guitar virtuoso of the 20th Century, but sadlynever received recognition outside of South America. Barrios’ music has been championed byvarious performers and has since become part of the standard repertoire. Una Limosna por el Amor de Dios (An Alm For The Love Of God) was written just a month before his death. While teaching oneevening, an old lady knocked on the door to beg for an alm (limosna) ‘for the love of God’. Thatevening, Barrios wrote the work, the opening two bars (which continues under the beautiful tremolo melody), referencing fate knocking at the door.

Antonio Vivaldi was an Italian composer, virtuoso violinist, teacher, and priest. He is regarded as one of the greatest Baroque composers, and his influence during his lifetime was widespread across Europe. He composed more than 500 concerti, including Concerto in C minor, RV 119, originally for string orchestra and harpsichord. Many of his compositions were written for the all-female music ensemble of the Ospedale della Pietà, a home for abandoned girls where Vivaldi had worked as a Catholic priest. The term Castanets (castañuelas) is derived from the Spanish word for chestnut, which they resemble. In Andalusia they are usually referred to as palillos (little sticks) instead, and this is the name by which they are known in Flamenco.

The Spanish composer Isaac Albéniz, being a pianist, never composed for the guitar. Transcriptions, however, form an important part of the guitar repertoire, with Segovia’s transcription of Asturias in all likelihood being the most popular. Asturias (Leyenda) was composed in 1892 as the prelude for the piece Chants d’espagne, consisting of three movements. The Chantsd’espagne were inspired by the Andulacian region of Spain, which had and still today has a strong Flamenco music culture.

The Flamenco influence is clearly demonstrated in the beginning section of the piece with its open string pedal point over the bass melody as well as the use of rasgueado chords. The contrasting second section has strong similarity to the unaccompanied solo singing, which also forms an important part of the Flamenco genre. Albéniz was known to have found much inspiration from the ancient Moorish architecture, including the renowned Alhambra.

In 1985 the Italian guitarist, Carlo Domeniconi (b.1947) wrote Koyunbaba, a virtuosic composition in four movements. Domeniconi had taught at the Istanbul Conservatoire between1977 and 1980, in the process absorbing many influences from Turkish music. ‘Koyunbaba’ means ‘shepherd’ but also refers to a 13th century holy man after whom an area in south west Turkey isnamed. The two ideas are brought together in Domeniconi’s concept, that a shepherd is uniquely

given both the time and insight to contemplate and understand the vastness and immense power of nature. Each of the four movements develops a separate mood in the hypnotic fashion of eastern music and on a time-scale that reflects the unhurried life of both shepherd and mystic, using a widerange of the guitar’s available devices and textures.

Francisco Tárrega, the founder of a new school of guitar, composed an immense number of guitar music for his time, totalling 78 original scores and 120 transcriptions. Tárrega’s extremely popular Capricho Árabe, composed after a trip to Granada, can be seen as his representation of the Arabian influence on Spanish music, dating back to the Moorish occupation of the Iberian Peninsula during the 8th Century AD. This is best heard in the piece's use of the Phrygian mode, as heard in the opening phrase.

The French composer Jacques Ibert studied under Paul Vidal at the Paris Conservatoire and won the Prix de Rome in 1919 for his cantata Le poète et la fée. From 1937 he was director of the French Academy in Rome, and from 1955 to 1957 directed Paris' Opéra-Comique. This brief but brilliant Entr'acte is one of his most well-recognized works and a direct product of his love for Spanish literature and music. It opens with a breathless, whirling dance with propulsive accompaniment, inspired by Flamenco guitar music. Palmas is a style of handclapping used in Flamenco music as an essential form of percussion to help punctuate and accentuate the piece.

The Afro-Cuban composer, classical guitarist and conductor, Leo Brouwer, was born in 1939 (Cuba). His enormous influence on classical guitar music is demonstrated by more than a hundred recordings on which he has played, composed or conducted. Paisaje Cubano con Campanas (Cuban Landscape with Bells) written in 1986, is a fascinating piece which the multiple personalities of theguitar are brought to expression through Brouwer’s unique 20th century language. The piece usesrepeated fragments, harmonics and some special effects to create a sound landscape from whichthe listeners are transported to Fidel Castro’s Cuba.

Virtuoso, guitar composer, and poet Agustín Barrios Mangoré (1885-1944) was born in Southern Paraguay.. He was perhaps the greatest guitar virtuoso of the 20th Century, but sadlynever received recognition outside of South America. Barrios’ music has been championed byvarious performers and has since become part of the standard repertoire. Una Limosna por el Amor de Dios (An Alm For The Love Of God) was written just a month before his death. While teaching oneevening, an old lady knocked on the door to beg for an alm (limosna) ‘for the love of God’. Thatevening, Barrios wrote the work, the opening two bars (which continues under the beautiful tremolo melody), referencing fate knocking at the door.

Antonio Vivaldi was an Italian composer, virtuoso violinist, teacher, and priest. He is regarded as one of the greatest Baroque composers, and his influence during his lifetime was widespread across Europe. He composed more than 500 concerti, including Concerto in C minor, RV 119, originally for string orchestra and harpsichord. Many of his compositions were written for the all-female music ensemble of the Ospedale della Pietà, a home for abandoned girls where Vivaldi had worked as a Catholic priest. The term Castanets (castañuelas) is derived from the Spanish word for chestnut, which they resemble. In Andalusia they are usually referred to as palillos (little sticks) instead, and this is the name by which they are known in Flamenco.

The Spanish composer Isaac Albéniz, being a pianist, never composed for the guitar. Transcriptions, however, form an important part of the guitar repertoire, with Segovia’s transcription of Asturias in all likelihood being the most popular. Asturias (Leyenda) was composed in 1892 as the prelude for the piece Chants d’espagne, consisting of three movements. The Chantsd’espagne were inspired by the Andulacian region of Spain, which had and still today has a strong Flamenco music culture. The Flamenco influence is clearly demonstrated in the beginning section of the piece with its open string pedal point over the bass melody as well as the use of rasgueado chords. The contrasting second section has strong similarity to the unaccompanied solo singing, which also forms an important part of the Flamenco genre. Albéniz was known to have found much inspiration from the ancient Moorish architecture, including the renowned Alhambra.

  • Instagram
  • Facebook